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Alcohol Awareness Week

Overview

Alcohol Awareness Week is an initiative by The Salvation Army designed to stimulate more discussion and debate in the community around the social impacts of alcohol abuse. For 2013, the campaign calls for an urgent review alcohol advertising and promotion.

The new Roy Morgan research surveyed 1,001 people (aged 18 and over) across the nation and specifically reveals:

  • 72.9% say alcohol and sport have become too closely related in Australia today.
  • 67.2% just like tobacco advertising was phased out, it is now time to start phasing out alcohol sponsorship of sport.
  • 70.3 % say the amount of alcohol advertising and promotion young people under 25 see these days encourages them to drink more.
  • 78% indicate concern that alcohol companies are using social media to advertise and promote their products to young people under 25.
  • 72.1% disagree that the alcohol industry should be allowed to continue to regulate itself with regard to the advertising and promotion of alcohol.
  • 60.1% of people aged 18-34 think that the amount of alcohol advertising and promotion young people under 25 see these days encourages them to drink more.
  • Over 70% of people aged 18-34 are concerned to some extent that alcohol companies are using social media to advertise and promote their products to young people under 25.

Based on the significant levels of community concern demonstrated by this new survey, The Salvation Army calls on the Federal Government to make it a high priority to review the advertising of alcohol and its impact on children and young people, and to put in place more effective measures to reduce the harm being caused.

Read the Media Release


The Facts

The Salvation Army in Australia has produced a booklet entitled The Facts: Binge Drinking & Alcohol Abuse to help educate people on the dangers of alcohol.


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Previous Alcohol Awareness Week research

2012 Alcohol Awareness Week

Alcohol Awareness Week is an initiative by The Salvation Army designed to stimulate more discussion and debate in the community around the social impacts of alcohol abuse. For 2012, the campaign reveals some alarming results concerning the impact of alcohol on Australian families and children.

Key findings of the new Roy Morgan research include:

  • 4.2 million people aged 14 plus (22%) say that they know families where they think that children are not being properly cared for because of someone's alcohol abuse.
  • 2.9 million people aged 14 plus (16%) say that they know families where they think that children may be unsafe because of someone’s alcohol abuse.
  • 2.0 million people aged 14 plus (11%) say that in the last 12 months the use of alcohol had ‘sometimes’ caused problems with other family members in their or their extended family. Another 2% said ‘often’ and another 1% said ‘always’, making a total of 2.6 million people (14%) saying that in the last 12 months, in their family or extended family, someone’s use of alcohol had caused problems with other family members.
  • 2.1 million people aged 14 plus (11%) say that someone in their family or extended family had been unreliable to family or friends due to alcohol use in the last 12 months.
  • 3.1 million (16%) of Australians aged 14 plus indicated that alcohol had caused some form of disruption within their immediate or extended family within the last 12 months.

Through the Alcohol Awareness campaign, The Salvation Army urges people to consider their drinking choices and the impact this is having on themselves, their friends, families and children.

Read the Media Release

2011 Alcohol Awareness Week

The Salvation Army’s annual Alcohol Awareness campaign for 2011 looks at the links between alcohol and mental health. Through the campaign, we hope to encourage debate in our communities about alcohol habits. The Salvos are encouraging all Australians to think seriously about their use of alcohol and make it a topic of conversation among family and friends.

New Roy Morgan research released by The Salvation Army shows:

  • 15.1 million people aged 14 plus (81%) now consider that drinking alcohol can worsen a person’s mental health.
  • 1.8 million people aged 14 plus (10%) say they sometimes drink alcohol as a way of dealing with feeling down or anxious.
  • 3.9 million people aged 14 plus (21%) say they sometimes end up drinking more alcohol than they had planned to.

The research also highlights that huge numbers of Australians aged 14 and over associate drinking large amounts of alcohol with a variety of mental health issues.

  • 14.1 million (76%) say as far as they are aware, drinking a large amount of alcohol can be associated with major depressive orders. Approximately 12.7 million (68%) say as far as they are aware, drinking a large amount of alcohol can be associated with anxiety disorders.
  • Approximately10.2 million (55%) say as far as they are aware, drinking a large amount of alcohol can be associated with bi-polar depression.
  • 11.2 million (60%) say as far as they are aware, drinking a large amount of alcohol can be associated with social phobias.

Read the Media Release

2010 Alcohol Awareness Week

The Salvation Army’s 2010 Alcohol Awareness campaign looked at why people drink alcohol, have they tried to reduce the amount they are drinking and if they’ve been unsuccessful in that effort, why?

Roy Morgan Research released by The Salvation Army on Monday, 13 September, concludes the consumption and misuse of alcohol remain major elements of the Australian way of life. It reveals, for example, that 12% of people sometimes drink simply because they want to get drunk (2.1 million people), and that within this overall number one in three 18-24 year olds reported that they sometimes or often consume alcohol because they want to get drunk.

The research estimates more than 7% of people often or sometimes drink alcohol “in order to feel normal” (approximately 1.3 million people).

The research also shows that in the past year 26.5% (approximately 4.8 million people) have deliberately cut down on the amount of alcohol they were drinking at the one time. Nearly 28% (approximately 5 million people) deliberately went without alcohol for a week.

In an encouraging move, The Salvation Army says the new research shows that in the past 12 months, 16% (approximately 2.9 million people) deliberately changed their drinking habits so that at least one day a week was alcohol free. Read media release and research report.

2009 Alcohol Awareness Week

The Salvation Army’s 2009 Alcohol Awareness campaign looked at the lack of awareness of the consequences of underage drinking, as set out in government guidelines amongst Australians.

Research released by The Salvation Army revealed 2.3 million Australians had their first alcoholic sip or drink when they were just 10 years of age or under. 7 million Australians had their first alcoholic sip or drink in their home and 8.8 million Australians had their first alcoholic sip or drink when they were with their family.

The research also revealed that 12.1 million Australians are not aware of the national guidelines on alcohol which indicate that for 15 to 17 year olds, the safest option is to delay the initiation of drinking for as long as possible.

1.7 million Australians believe it is safe to give someone 12 or under an occasional sip of alcohol and 5 million Australians believe it is safe for someone 15 years or under to be given occasional sips of alcohol.

The Salvos’ 2009 Alcohol Awareness campaign is designed to educate people about this research which shows the earlier a person starts drinking, the more likely it is they will have problems with alcohol in later life. The campaign also highlighted that whilst many people believe giving teenagers alcohol on a limited basis is a good thing, it can be risky. Read the full media release and research report.